Category mountains
Benimantell shares one of the most privileged areas of the Alicante province with its natural surroundings with the rest of the Guadalest Valley towns.   The Sierra de Aitana is known for its variety of flowers and aromatic plants. More than 1,200 species of higher plants have been cataloged with many endemisms, among which we can highlight jewels such as the Cistanche phelypaea and the Teucrium lepicephalum . The nature of the valley takes on very special characteristics between the end of January and the beginning of March when the thousands of almond trees that cover these beautiful mountains magically open their flowers and flood the terraces of the mountains with spectacular white. The Sierra de Aitana, together with the Sierra de Serrella and the Puig Campana was declared SCI (place of community interest) . In the shade of La Aitana there are different protected areas due to their botanical interest,  the flora micro-reserves.  In addition, the mountains of the valley are part of the zone declared of Special Protection of Birds (ZEPA) .
The Guadalest Reservoir that extends its waters through the terms of Benimantell, Castell de Guadalest and Beniardà requires special mention. This beautiful natural setting offers many possibilities for enjoyment and even refreshment in its emerald waters.
  As for fauna, you can find the wild boar, fox, weasel, hedgehog, horseback, squirrel, badger, rabbit … and it is increasingly easy to bump into cliffs and cut from the highest areas of the mountains, the imposing Arruí or Mouflon of the Atlas. If we look at the sky we will be able to observe eagles, hawks, kestrels, owlets … Blackbirds, bee-eaters, great titers, goldfinches, robins, partridges … in the pine forests and crops. Sparrows, starlings and swallows in the village. Among the reptiles are the Ocellated Lizard, the Lizard, the Ladder Snake and the Bastard Snake. And amphibians the toad, the frog and the common gecko among others
Category Gastronomia
L’arròs amb fessóls i penques, la olleta de blat, borreta, les minxos, les pilotes de dacsa and les faves sacsades, are some of the delicacies that Benimantell’s cuisine offers and that will surprise the most demanding palates. There is also the possibility of tasting grilled meats or unique rice dishes.

And to finish off the task, nothing better than savoring some typical sweet, such as pastissets d’ametla, Christian cakes, almond or carquinyoles.

All simmered with local produce and recipes anchored in a past with Moorish roots.

Noticias de benimantell.es

Category activities

 

ROAD BIKE

Many are the professionals of road cycling who choose our lands to prepare for the new season during winter.

Thanks to the variety of terrain that can be found including large mountain passes, favorable weather, quiet roads and spectacular scenery, the villages of the Guadalest Valley are ideal for cyclists.

Cycling tests such as the Vuelta cyclist to Spain have passed through Benimantell , as well as cyclotourism marches that bring together, year after year, many lovers of this sport.

 

MOUNTAIN BIKE – MOUNTAIN BIKE

The mountains that surround Benimantell, Aitana, Xortà and Serrella offer us a multitude of routes for our enjoyment with mountain biking.

 

Category activities

Benimantell together with the other villages of the Guadalest Valley offers hiking lovers endless options.

Choose the route that most appeals to you, download it and start discovering the beauty of our landscapes.

* One of Benimantell’s top priorities is the conservation of the environment.
For this reason, it requires hikers not to abandon any waste and, in addition, encourages them to collect what anyone else, due to their irresponsibility, has left. Also, you have to respect the plants and not disturb the fauna. He also calls for an effort to minimize car use, not walking off the trails, and lighting a fire is prohibited.

 

Scroll through Instagram and get a load of all the traveling couples: mugging for selfies, star-jumping on piers, and cheers-ing over sickeningly romantic sunsets. If you’ve ever taken a trip with a significant other, you know this is, at best, far more rose-colored than real life on the road with bae, and not just because of the Amaro filter. Truth is, traveling together is hard, and comes with as many pitfalls as it does perks.

These are the mistakes to avoid when you go abroad with a partner, so you can travel the world together and not only live to tell the tale, but do so without bickering too much between sentences.

Doing the deed all wrong

Sex is usually pretty high up the to-do list on a couples getaway, so make sure you’ve got everything you need to start your trip with a (*ahem*) bang. In many countries, you won’t have as easy access to birth control as you do back home — and even if you can find a pharmacy, good luck trying to mime out “prophylactic” in the local dialect.

So now you’ve got the kit, but don’t drop trou just anywhere simply because you’re on an exotic vacation. Make sure you’re on top of the local laws, as well as each other — in some countries, the authorities don’t look kindly on PDA. Get a little too affectionate on a Dubai beach for example, and you might get handcuffed and locked up in jail for the night (and not in the fun way).

Skimping on privacy

A dirty weekend in a tiny hotel room sounds romantic, but it’s actually a pretty intense breakdown of boundaries — especially for a new couple. For the first time, you’re basically obliged to spend 24 hours a day in each other’s company, and you’re finally going to find out if your partner does, indeed, poop like everyone else.

It’s tempting to book the cheapest room, but it’s worth shelling out for a bigger option just to ease yourself into sharing personal space. Go ahead and book a suite or a room with a balcony so you’ve got somewhere to get some fresh air, when the time comes.

Falling prey to scams and ripoffs

Walking around with your hands in each other’s pockets sure looks cute, but it screams “easy target” to people who make a living out of ripping off tourists. Before you can say “Nah, Nah, Nah thanks, NAH,” you’ll be propositioned for average-at-best caricatures, $20 single roses, and upgrades to fancier cars at the rental place. You might feel awkward like you’re obliged to stump up cash or look like a cheapskate in front of your beau. But that’s how these people want you to feel. The truth is, if your partner is halfway worth holding onto, they’ll be a lot more impressed if you politely tell the scammers to move along, sharpish. And have a conversation ahead of time about how you plan to handle any sudden big-ticket expenses.

Taking crazy risks sans travel insurance

There’s nothing quite like a $50,000 hospital bill to sour a romantic trip. If you do get hurt abroad, it’s nice to have a spot of travel insurance, so your partner doesn’t have to play an absolute hero. Juliette Sivertsen, who writes the Snorkels to Snow blog, went exploring ancient burial caves in Fiji with her partner, John. “His first mistake was disturbing the hornets’ nest,” she recalls, “but then he tried to run away, and fell down a cliff, breaking his wrist and smashing the front of his leg on a rock. You could see the bone coming out — I’ve never heard a grown man howl and scream so loudly in my life.” Juliette’s top tip is “if in pain, get on a plane” — in their case, New Zealand was the best option.

Extra tip: Before you go, commit to memory all your other half’s vital statistics — birth date, medications, allergies, blood type, health insurer and so on. And make sure you’ve got a contact number for their family too, in case of hornet nest incidents.

Spending every single waking moment together

No matter how much you wuv your partner, don’t spend 24 hours in their face — you’ll get sick of it eventually, probably about 23 hours after your partner does. Jarryd and Alesha, who have been traveling together for nine years under the joint pen name Nomadasaurus, suggest that couples schedule that time apart. “Go for a solo hike, head to the shops on your own, hit up different bars one night,” they say. “Not only will you get a break from each other, you’ll also have something new to talk about.”

Sucking at sharing

Sharing is one of the best and worst bits of a relationship. There’s nothing more infuriating than ordering a prime steak and then having your partner ask for half of it in exchange for some of their soggy mushroom frittata. But there are bonuses, too. Don’t stuff two sets of boring essentials (sunscreen, toothpaste, shower gel, etc.) in your already-too-heavy backpacks. Pack together, do a pre-trip shop together, or even agree to share some clothes to cut down on luggage.

Oversharing with the rest of us

By all means, post the heck out of that couples selfie at the Eiffel Tower — just be conscientious of your partner, who might start feeling like they’re on a trip with your followers instead of you. There’s a vast difference between being an obnoxiously happy couple and just playing one on Instagram. Lest you spend the better half of your trip staring at your screens instead of each other, make an effort to stow your phones and, I don’t know, talk or something.

Freaking out over the little things

All you need is love. And passports. And money. But everything else is pretty much non-essential, so don’t throw a hissy fit if you forget to pack your fourth-favorite sweater or leave your sister’s headphones on the plane. Frank and Cathy from Roarloud say “We’ve forgotten loads of stuff on our travels, but there’s always a way to figure it out. In fact, it has become a running gag for us to say, ‘Did we forget anything?’ when we set out on a trip. The answer always is ‘Of course.’” Cue chuckles all around, until it turns out Frank’s forgotten Cathy’s birthday.

Splitting up

Cathy offers their surest rule: “Whenever you go off to do different things, arrange a time and place to meet back up — and stick to it.” It’s no use having phones if you hit a signal dead zone, and nothing will melt down a trip like it becoming a missed connection. Of course, if your partner is driving you nuts, this is also an excellent way of making sure they’re elsewhere while you scroll through Tinder.

Category Trip Ideas

Multi-generational travel.

Are you game enough to embark on a family road trip with kids and their grandparents?

The road ahead is fraught with possible danger, possible tears and head slapping moments.
But, it’s also filled with treasured bonding experiences between your children and their grandparents (and of course between you and your parents.) Having a plan is key to making it heaven rather than hell (so is daily meditation in the months leading up to you it so you can practice letting IT go.) You define what that IT is when it comes to the grandparents!

We checked off many lifetime bucket list experiences, grew closer, and didn’t have one bad moment. You can read more tips for planning a multi-generational family road trip in this post.

Our tips for surviving a road trip with kids and grandparents will help you reach that divine experience.

1. Do you have a big enough car?

First and foremost, this is the greatest challenge for you to solve. If your vehicle is not big enough, you may have to look at renting a bigger car, or two cars. Perhaps your parents can drive their own vehicle, or you can rent two smaller cars if separation is needed.

Although, I do think time spent together while driving between destinations can often be the most rewarding! Don’t forget to consider luggage space.

If this is an issue, you can buy skyboxes for the top of your car which helps. We have a Yakima Skybox which is excellent and came in handy for our multi-generational road trip.

2. Assign everyone a role

It’s great to give everyone a role to play in the car, and exploring a city. If you have multiple drivers, you’ll want to switch up the roles as well. Give the children something they can easily manage and will enjoy doing. I’m pretty sure Savannah was Chief Entertainer and Kalyra, simply The Boss.

You decide what makes sense for your family style but here are a few suggestions:

  • Driver
  • Chief Navigator
  • Time Keeper
  • Entertainer
  • Organizer
  • Foodie

3. Service, clean and organize the car

A car can quickly turn into a messy toddlers bedroom when road tripping with multiple people. So it’s essential you start with a clean and organized car and do your best to keep it that way!

  • Where will you put the luggage?
  • What about storing entertainment inside the car?
  • What about food and water?
  • Do you have a garbage bag?
Storage boxes, small trash cans, and over the seat organizers come in handy.
Have a place for everything and instruct all passengers of where things belong and their roles in keeping a tidy car. Every time you stop the car, instruct everyone to collect any trash and dispose of it. These good habits will keep a tidy car.

Make sure you service the car before your trip. The last thing you want is car troubles on your dream family vacation.

4. Have Ample Entertainment in the car

There are multiple ways you can entertain kids in the car:

board games – we like the miniature magnetic versions you can get of games like snakes and ladders, checkers, and clue. They’re easy to store and use in a car.
interactive games – you know those common ones like, Eye Spy.
coloring and reading books
Journal writing
iPad games and movies We currently homeschool our kids, so we use driving times to do some school work.
If this is not you, your children can research the next place to visit and discover some fun facts or interesting things to do and see while there. This helps them to connect to and feel ownership of the experience.

You could have them map out the journey or keep you updated on driving times and how much longer there is to go.

5. Limit devices and encourage interaction

I know how challenging this one is!

Road tripping with kids is exhausting and you’re tempted to let them get lost in movies and games. But you’re traveling with the grandparents and kids for quality time together, and hours in the car makes for good bonding opportunities. Allow your child to use their device but restrict their time on it. An hour on the device will give the grownups a bit of quiet time and Nan and Pop some time to snooze.

Encourage talking and interactive games in the spaces between and during rest breaks.

6. Plan your stops before you depart for the day

It’s a good idea to map out the day’s driving journey before you leave, noting possible places to stop for food or a stretch break.

This saves you the headache of researching while you are driving, only to find what sounds like an awesome place for coffee just as you drive on past the exit for it.

You may even want to research any quirky or historic roadside attractions you can stop off at to bring in those unexpected and memorable travel experiences.

We decided to stop at Gettysburg for a couple of nights as it was on the way from Asheville to New York City and we couldn’t drive the entire way in one stint.

7. Pack plenty of food and water for the car

We usually move so quickly after breakfast, and are on the road for such long stints, that we can be very disorganized with this road trip tip.

It does mean we waste a lot of time and money finding places to eat along the journey.

We also love to stop for coffee, which can chew up your time finding a good one! But, there’s just nothing like a hot coffee while you’re driving!

We are always trying to make our travel life easier so we can spend more time experiencing the places we visit.

There are lots of travel accessories we think we need, but what is essential for your long-term travel plans?

With so many choices, what are the best travel products you can bring along to improve your long-term traveling?

You don’t want to bring too much along with you because you’ll be carrying these items around with you in your suitcase for a long time.

But with a little planning and whittling down the essentials you will be sure to have everything you need.

Below are a few examples of some of the best travel accessories that will make your life easier on the road.

1. Organise Your Luggage with Travel Packing Cubes

Keeping your bag in some kind of organized state can be difficult when traveling long term. One way to keep your bag organised is to use packing cubes.

These cubes are a great way to keep your clothes and other items separate. Pack your different items in cubes, tops in one, trousers in the other.

Also, use them for laundry to keep dirty and clean clothes separated. You can even use them as a travelling wardrobe, only taking out which cubes you need at each time.

If you can’t decide which ones to choose, then take a look at these best packing cubes review and find the best ones to suit you.

As well as packing cubes, other luggage accessories to consider bringing are travel bottles. Some mini bottles come in handy when you don’t want to carry around large bottles of toiletries.

Decanting your favorite items into smaller containers means you can bring along everything you need without the bulk and weight. Larger ones are also great to use and fill up water or other beverages!

2. Useful Mobile Phone Apps

You never go anywhere without your mobile phone nowadays and they can be a useful tool for travel.

There are so many apps out there that are beneficial for both long and short-term travel.

There are the well-known apps for reviews such as TripAdvisor which will give you traveler information about restaurants, locations and hotels. It’s best practice to check out reviews before you book to avoid disappointment.

Also, really beneficial are Language apps that will help you converse with locals. These apps include Duolingo and Babbel, these can be really beneficial when in a spot with language difficulty.

You might want to use apps to meet people too.

These apps such as Meet Up, Eat With a Local and Party with a local, enable you to meet like-minded people in your destination. Make new friends or find someone to go on a tour with you, great if you are a solo traveler.

Partying with new people has never been so easy. Your mobile phone may just be your best travel accessory yet!

3. When I Want to be Alone – Headphones

Looking for travel gadgets to bring along on vacation with you that can have lots of uses at different parts of your trip?

If you are traveling long-term and taking lots of flights then you might want to invest in a pair of noise cancelling or noise isolating headphones.

If you are planning to get some sleep on your long flights then blocking out the noise can be one step towards a good sleep.

Headphones can be a lifesaver if you are staying in a hostel and need some sleep or feeling particularly unsociable. Block out the noise or give yourself some alone time, listen to some music and relax.

On the other hand, when you are watching TV or doing some language learning, you will keep the sounds from annoying anyone else.

4. Save for a rainy day with a Pac a Mac

There’s always that chance of rain no matter where you are. I have been caught in many a rain shower and a trusty Pac a Mac is the perfect solution.

Having this with you means you can carry on with your journey or at least keep yourself dry whilst you wait out the rain. It can happen in the best of places and sometimes without warning.

Yes, you could buy a rain cover en route or duck in somewhere are hide whilst the storm finishes. But you don’t want to waste precious time in your destination either.

So, brave the rain, don your Mac and enjoy!

Thinking about what clothes you are wearing, make sure you pack small and think big. Bring versatile clothing that mix and match and work for the places you will be visiting.

5. Keep Charged with Electronic Converters and Adapters

When you are traveling from place to place, especially through different countries you’ll need an international plug adapter.

There’s nothing worse than realizing you can’t connect or charge your electronic device whilst you are away. It can be costly to buy adapters on the road and they may not be fully safe either.

Making sure you bring the right converters and adapters to your destination is essential to improve your travel experience.

Plan ahead so you know what kind of adapters you need and if you’ll be staying anywhere that you need a special kind – Universal adapters won’t work in some places in Africa for example.

You also need to remember all your leads and a portable battery charger for your various electronics. Keeping them in their own special electronics packing cube makes finding what you need in your luggage a whole lot easier.

What is your favorite travel accessory?

There is always something you can’t live without whilst traveling and everyone has their favorite travel gear.

Whether it’s a comfy travel pillow, ear plugs or headphones to block out the noise, or those trusty walking boots. There are many things that could make the list but as you can see the above five items are a must have for a long-term traveler.

What travel items would you add to the list? Leave a comment below.

As a perpetual solo female traveler, one of the questions I frequently get asked is do I get lonely?

I mean, what a question! Of course, I get lonely when I travel solo but also sometimes when I am at home.

Traveling without a companion or partner can be completely daunting but I’ve found it to be one of the most rewarding and fulfilling styles of travel.

Like most types of travel, solo female travel has its ups and downs but at the end of the day, I heartily vouch that every person should try it at least once in their lives.

1. Stay in social accommodation

No, I don’t mean a hostel. If you’re a backpacker on a budget and looking for cheap accommodation, shared dorm rooms in hostels will certainly introduce you to people.

But I’m past those years of my life, though occasionally I still stay in hostels but in private rooms.

Nowadays there is a wide range of types of hostels you can stay in, some are categorized as “luxury” even. So when I’m traveling and looking to meet people oftentimes, I’ll book into a high-quality hostel in a private room and spend time in the common room or communal areas to meet people or participate in hostel group activities.

But most of the time I don’t like staying in hostels so I look for smaller, more intimate accommodation options, ones where you meet the owners and other guests easily, like small B&Bs or on AirBnB.

AirBnB and other similar accommodation rentals are a great way to meet the locals and get to see a different side of a destination. I’ve made friends with many AirBnB hosts over the years and it feels like I’m visiting a friend in the city or country where I’m visiting.

2. Hop on a guided tour

Depending on your trip, your travel style and where you are going you might consider hopping on a tour.

Usually, there are a range of tours that meet every type of need and interest. Day tours or multi-day tours, photography tours and budget tours even pub crawls, there are many types to choose from.

Usually, when I’m in a place like Europe, I prefer to travel around on my own, but when I want to get to places where I need a car, I’ll just hop on a day tour instead. It’s a great way to pack in a lot of sightseeing and meet new people.

At the end of every tour I’ve done I usually leave with a couple of new friends and sometimes we would meet up later on and either travel together or just grab coffee. After all, everyone is in the same boat as you.

If I’m traveling to a country where I’m either not comfortable traveling alone (rare now but still it happens) or I’m looking for a different kind or unique travel experience, I’ll book a multi-day tour.

For example, I just came home from a 3 week horseback riding trip through Mongolia with Zavkhan Trekking. Not even sure how I would even begin planning that on my own.

Last year for Christmas I joined in on a small-group local tour around New Zealand called Haka Tours, both of which fitted perfectly for what I wanted and almost everyone else on the tours were also solo travelers. Even if you travel by yourself, you’re rarely alone.

3. Participate in group activities

Aside from hopping on tours when you’re traveling around, another great way to stay social and meet people on the road is to join in on group activities.

I love having hands-on travel experiences, like eating, when I’m on the road so I tend to gravitate towards activities like cooking classes, food and market tours, and lots and lots of adventure activities, like bike tours, boat outings, and scenic flights.

Most of these activities book more than one person on them so you are guaranteed to meet people. There is nothing quite like making a new friend as you kayak through rapids or bake a local dish in a new city.

4. Make a travel buddy on the road

This usually works when you are traveling for extended periods of time and have a flexible schedule on the road, but also it can still work when your schedule is a bit limited.

Once I’ve met other solo travelers, if we’ve hung out a few times and have similar interests or want to go to the same place, sometimes it’s easy to just travel along together for a while.

This happens a lot on the well-trodden backpackers trails in Europe and Southeast Asia but also works in other parts of the world too.

5. Have a “Say Yes” policy when you’re feeling a bit lonely and be friendly

Maybe it’s just me but meeting people has never come easy to me. I am an introvert through and through, and it almost goes against my nature to intentionally be outgoing.

In the beginning, I had to force myself to talk to people. The easiest way is just to be really friendly. Depending on the country, I’ve found the majority of people love friendly solo travelers. It’s less intimidating than when you’re in groups and it just works.

On top of that when I’m traveling I try to have a “say yes” policy when people invite me to things.

Of course, I judge the situation and definitely say no if I feel unsafe or weird, but often times just putting yourself a little bit out of your comfort zone can be very rewarding.

These are the moments I tend to treasure the most on the road.

 

Mario Peshev piano.

You need to listen to something that focuses you. It needs to keep you motivated, as well as keeping you calm and collected. Ready for business.